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LORENZO MARINI Alphatype 21

Free

June 3, 2021 • 6:00 pm - August 29, 2021

(All times are in PDT)

Discover the virtual exhibit Alphatype21 by Milanese artist Lorenzo Marini exploring typography and color in mixed media and installation works merging visual art and poetry.

After the landmark exhibition held in Venice at the Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, an exhibition of originals at the Gaggenau Design Elementi Hub in Milan, Italy and a preview at the 2020 LA Art Fair, now Los Angeles is host to an exhibition that celebrates the artistic journey of the founder of the “TypeArt” movement that finally set letters free. In the words of the exhibition’s curator, Peter Frank, “For Lorenzo Marini art is a voyage of catharsis in search of the ‘Word’. So, for Marini, art represents that meaning, that word, that has filled and continues to fill every day with the “silence” of daily life.”

The 14 artworks on view retrace the journey begun with Marini’s manifesto for the liberation of letters. The exhibition will include two “Alphatype” works and two Snowtype” works. At the center of the exhibition space, the artist has created a dynamic installation: an homage to the fountains of Italy, in which the gush of water is replaced by the gush of letters.

Special thanks to Eataly Los Angeles and Guzzini.

LORENZO MARINI is an Italian artist who lives and works in Milan, Italy, Los Angeles and New York.
Marini attended the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice, where he was mentored by Emilio Vedova. After obtaining his degree in architecture, he spent the next thirty years building a successful career in advertising.
In 2016 Marini had an artistic epiphany that led him to celebrate the beauty of letters. In 2017, fresh from this success, he published his manifesto for the liberation of Type, in so doing becoming the founder of a new art form: that of devoting an artwork to each individual letter of the alphabet, liberating letters from their duty of function in order to celebrate their pure intrinsic beauty.
In Visual, his first phase, Marini’s paintings can be read as the translation of advertising campaigns into contemporary art, with a rigorous logic of spaces and equilibria. But in this second artistic phase, they can also be read as a revolutionary interpretation of the pop beauty of the contemporary alphabet.